Traditional tiling

Traditional tiling

One of the traditional decorative-applied arts of Iran is the traditional tile. The use of glazed bricks is one of the most beautiful architectural developments that has led to the proliferation of beautiful tiles that over time have come into play with the changes that have been made to it, as we see it today. In the 6th century AH, tiles with turquoise and azure glazes became increasingly popular and were widely used in addition to glazed bricks. This art is an art of decorative arts based on the traditional architecture of Iran and today it is in New buildings also have many uses. Traditional tiles are categorized according to their type of production into the following categories: non-slip bricks, mosaic tiles, seven-tile tiles, gold plated tiles and enamel tiles. Perhaps the history of bricklaying usage may be related to the time of Babylon and the history of the second millennium BC. In Iran, examples of Achaemenid times are seen in the Iranian plateau buildings, especially in Persepolis and Persepolis. Until the early seventh century, the material used to make tiles was flower, but in the sixth century A, a handmade material known as stone dough or Chinese paste, it was customary and during the Seljuk regime, tile production was stunningly developed. Its main center was Kashan. During this period, three monochrome glazes, enamel paints and glazes were used on the glaze.